The Treaty of New Echota was signed between the United States Government and representatives of a minority Cherokee Political Faction


The Treaty of New Echota was signed between the United States Government and representatives of a minority Cherokee Political Faction featured image - on that day

Date : 1835-December-29

Country : United States of America (USA)

Description :

The Cherokee is one part of the indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands of the United States. They lived in their homelands located in towns along the river valleys before the 18th century. At present, southwestern North Carolina, southeastern Tennessee, edges of western South Carolina, northern Georgia, and northeastern Alabama are included in the old homelands of the Cherokee.

On December 29, 1835, in New Echota, Georgia, the Treaty of New Echota was signed between the United States government and representatives of a minority Cherokee political faction to cede all lands of the Cherokee east of the Mississippi River to the United States for $5 million. 

Here, on individual allotments of 160 acres of land, the treaty contained a provision allowing any Cherokees who so wished to do so to stay and become citizens of the states in which they lived. Therefore, the treaty was unanimously approved by the contingent at New Echota and also signed by the negotiating committee of twenty. However, United States President Andrew Jackson eventually removed that clause from the treaty.

As per the terms of this treaty, the Cherokee Nation had to cede its territory in the southeast to the United States and move to the Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River. However, the treaty was not approved by the Cherokee National Council and not signed by Principal Chief John Ross. But, in March 1836, the treaty was amended and ratified, and it was also the legal approval for forced removal. This removal was known as the Trail of Tears.

Category : Politics


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